Right now, medical aid in dying is not legal in New York. Medical aid in dying enables a terminally ill person, with decision-making capacity and the ability to self-administer medication, to obtain a lethal prescription from their medical provider to choose the timing of their death. As of December 2021, it is legal in ten states (the geographically closest being New Jersey and Vermont), plus Washington D.C. There are active efforts in New York, including by End of Life Choices New York, to legalize medical aid and dying as an option.

For more information, please visit https://endoflifechoicesny.org/advocacy/proposed-legislation/aid-in-dying/

January 3, 2022

Is medical aid in dying an option in New York?

Right now, medical aid in dying is not legal in New York. Medical aid in dying enables a terminally ill person, with decision-making capacity and the […]
January 3, 2022

Do terminally ill New Yorkers have the right to receive information about their end-of-life options?

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Are medical providers required to let their patients know about palliative care?

In 2011, New York passed the Palliative Care Access Act (PCAA). The PCAA mandates that hospitals, nursing homes, home care agencies, and enhanced or special needs […]
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What is the legal status of the Dementia Directive? Are there special considerations?

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If my loved one is listed as a surrogate in the Family Health Care Decisions Act, do I still need to complete a Health Care Proxy?

The person this law designates as the one who can make decisions on your behalf may not be the person you would trust to follow your […]
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What happens if I don’t complete a Health Care Proxy?

There is a law in New York called the Family Health Care Decisions Act, which passed in 2010. If you don’t have a Health Care Proxy […]
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